xij9gq
Last Updated: February 25, 2016
·
3.32K
· janosgyerik

Elegant way to remove offending key from known hosts file

ssh

This should look familiar:

$ ssh mars
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@    WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!     @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!
Someone could be eavesdropping on you right now (man-in-the-middle attack)!
It is also possible that a host key has just been changed.
The fingerprint for the RSA key sent by the remote host is
67:7e:21:58:e4:12:eb:d4:3c:22:45:69:f5:08:63:ee.
Please contact your system administrator.
Add correct host key in /home/jack/.ssh/known_hosts to get rid of this message.
Offending RSA key in /home/jack/.ssh/known_hosts:17
RSA host key for example.com has changed and you have requested strict checking.
Host key verification failed.

Let's assume you know for a fact it's not really a man in the middle attack.
For example your sysadmin told you yesterday that they installed a new SSL certifate on your server "mars".
Here are some solutions, in increasing order of elegance and awesomeness:

a. Fire up your text editor, find line 17, delete it, save the file (booo!)

b. Fire up vim ~/.ssh/known_hosts, press 17G to jump directly to line 17, press dd to delete the line, press :wq to save and exit (yeah, rockin'!)

c. Fire up vim +17 ~/.ssh/known_hosts, press dd and then :wq

d. Run vim +17d +wq ~/.ssh/known_hosts, job's done (you're a vim ninja!)

e. Run ssh-keygen -R example.com, job's done

The last one is the best,
but I don't like that it's so unintuitive.
What's this to do with generating keys!

Notice that in the ssh-keygen -R servername command you cannot use the SSH alias name, like I did ssh mars in the beginning.
You have to type the server name as it is written near the end of the error message, example.com in this example.